Time for a Change?

Menopause is a dreaded word for many women. I can’t imagine that anyone would look forward to the common signs that at least 80% of women in the Western world develop –

Hot flushes (short, sudden feelings of heat, usually in the face, neck and chest)
Night sweats (hot flushes that occur at night)
Difficulty in sleeping
Reduced sex drive
Problems with memory and concentration
Vaginal dryness and pain, itching or discomfort during sex
Headaches
Mood changes, such as low mood or anxiety
Palpitations – heartbeats that suddenly become more noticeable
Joint stiffness, aches and pains
Reduced muscle mass
Recurrent urinary tract infections (UTIs)
Menopause can also increase the risk of developing certain other problems, such as osteoporosis. See my book Love Your Bones for all the advice you need on how to maintain strong bones for life.

I’ll confess, I have had menopause and I think I had one night sweat, and that was it (and it could have been that I ate too many chillies during the day on that day…)
So why do so many women suffer with the above conditions for months (and sometimes years!), whilst in Japan, for example, there is not even a word for “hot flush”? it’s all about hormones – and a few other things. Hormone levels drop as we age, especially if we eat a standard British diet. This goes for men too – andropause is definitely a “thing” if you’re not careful. This correlates with age-related fat gain, loss of lean muscle mass, reduced bone density, thinning skin and other degenerative changes. Sounds great, right? Who would sign up for that?

One huge problem is actually oestrogen dominance, which “crowds out” the other sex hormones and prevents them from exerting some of their benefits. Oestrogen dominance occurs from the following:

High stress levels
Xenoestrogens (synthetic oestrogens in the environment and in food)
Poor detoxification in the liver
Birth control pills
Ageing
Poor nutrition
Inappropriate synthetic HRT
Lack of exercise

Thus far, the “solution” in general for menopause appears to be synthetic HRT, but with this focusing on oestrogen rather than a balanced approach to all the different hormones, it could actually be making matters a lot worse. The assumptions are:

Assumed low levels of sex hormones in menopausal females
Assumed “oestrogen deficiency”

There are many problems with “unopposed” oestrogen – i.e. oestrogen supplementation in the absence of other hormones, particularly if that oestrogen comes from synthetic sources. I will discuss all these in my forthcoming Healthy Hormone Balance seminars – e-mail me via max@therawfoodscientist.com for more information, or to book me to present this important information to your group.

Have you heard about healthy eating options which reduce the likelihood of menopausal symptoms? The diet needs to be plant based (avoiding soya, unless fermented), pure and fresh, not processed, supportive of liver detoxification, and with whole food supplementation (this is the one I use and recommend). All this and more is discussed in my book The Whole Body Solution and I also focus on all the right foods to eat in the Healthy Hormone Balance seminar, including all the foods that block and remove the so-called “bad oestrogen” – such as high fibre foods, cruciferous vegetables and more.

Since all your hormones are initially made from cholesterol, fat is not the “bad guy”! Whilst you definitely do not need a cholesterol supplement, there are certain fats that will assist with healthy hormone balance. There’s one that I particularly recommend, and it’s discussed in my blog here, as well as in my MP3 The Importance of Fat. The best essential fat supplement contains omega 3, 5, 6, 7 and 9, and you can order it here.

So there you have it – proper detoxification, cleaning up your diet and making it plant-based, as well as taking appropriate supplementation, can make all the difference if you want to balance your hormones as you age – and this applies to everyone – both sexes included!

About Max Tuck

Hippocrates Health Educator. Long term living foods vegan. Athlete, lecturer, author of four books (with the 5th coming soon) and firm advocate of healthy living.
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