Breaking the Rules

It has been my great pleasure over the years to meet many people who, like myself, follow a living and raw foods lifestyle. Many of these people follow their particular program conscientiously, apart from when they don’t. What do I mean by that? What I mean is there are occasions when it is not possible to follow the program to the letter. This has happened to me recently when my fridge freezer broke down (as I write this, I am still waiting for it to be repaired – I don’t want to replace it since I designed my whole kitchen around it). What we have to consider if we are going to deviate from our chosen health path is the following:

1. How often will we deviate?
2. Why are we deviating?
3. What are the consequences of deviating?
4. What are the consequences of not deviating?
5. How far from our usual dietary program are we going to deviate?

Firstly, let’s consider how often. It’s what we do consistently that makes the difference. I don’t really need to elaborate much here – for more about consistency you can read my separate blog Consistency is the Key. Suffice it to say that if you deviate twice a week, it will have a greater impact than once a month, or once every 6 months. Obvious really.

Why would we deviate? After all, we know that the living foods vegan lifestyle is incredibly powerful. Why would we want to introduce anything other than wonderful living foods, ever? Well, circumstances might dictate it. Last month, at the wedding of one of my greatest friends, I ate a cooked lentil dish. Shock, horror. As a strong, fit, healthy living foods vegan, this had very little effect on me. I am not battling a life-threatening disease. I was hardly going to refuse a wedding invitation to avoid a cooked meal. No, it was important for me to have fun and share the wonderful experience with my friends. Being happy with great company is known to raise endorphin levels, boosting both the mood and the immune system. This, in my opinion, and also from personal experience of the many years I have been living this way, was more beneficial on that particular occasion than eating a bowl of sprouts at home alone.

The consequences of deviating? They may be positive, as outlined above, or negative, depending on how much deviation is involved (see below). Negative consequences could include feeling tired (this often happens if you eat the heavier cooked foods such as potatoes), bloating (bread is the one that is going to cause this in most cases), other intestinal signs e.g. constipation or diarrhoea, headaches etc.

The consequences of not deviating? These usually relate to the emotional consequences. Do you feel isolated? Weird? An outcast? Feelings of sadness adversely affect one’s confidence and also the immune system. Whilst one really bad meal can negatively impact cells right down to the DNA, it’s also been shown that strong negative emotions, particularly sadness or loneliness (which can occur if everyone else seems to be having fun and you’re not) can be especially detrimental.

If we choose to deviate, how far do we go? For me, if I do ever eat cooked food, it is always vegan, and healthy at that. This, for me, is non-negotiable. It is never “junk vegan”, for example chips (fries for my North American readers), burgers or anything processed. I haven’t eaten a chip since I was 11 years old; I am certainly not going to start now. If you’re in the “I have to eat a cooked meal” situation, I suggest choosing the healthiest vegan option available, and have a salad with it. The hotel I was staying at for the wedding was a very grand affair, and even breakfast was silver service. No buffets here. I had mint tea, fresh fruit salad, followed by grilled mushrooms and raw avocado. Not what I would ever have at home, but the best I could do. And you know what? The view from the restaurant was so phenomenal that it brought joy to my day just to sit and look out of the window. If that doesn’t boost the mood and make you realise how great it is to be alive, I don’t know what will.

About Max Tuck

Hippocrates Health Educator. Long term living foods vegan. Athlete, lecturer, author of four books (with the 5th coming soon) and firm advocate of healthy living.
This entry was posted in Vegan food and tagged , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s